Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Ethics in the Professions Series, “Ethics in the Workplace.” Offered through UNC Human Resources’ Training and Development Department, this course is an introduction to ethical decision making. This course helps participants learn how to identify ethical issues, think about them productively, and arrive at ethically sound decisions. Participants will leave the course prepared to share their skills in ethical decision making with their colleagues.

 

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

Bioethics at UNC (BUNC) Group Meeting, “Duty to Warn? Disclosure of HIV Status.” In this monthly meeting group, faculty and graduate students gather over breakfast to discuss timely ethical issues in bioethics. This session is led by Ali Groves, graduate student at Gilling School of Global Public Health. Co-sponsored with the Department of Social Medicine.

 

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

Public Lecture, “Contemporary Environmental Aesthetics and the Requirements of Environmentalism,” featuring Professor Allen Carlson, University of Alberta. This is the third part in a colloquium series on philosophy and the environment. Sponsored by the Institute for the Environment, the Parr Center for Ethics, and the Department of Philosophy.

 

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

Lunch & Learn Workshop, “Why Can’t We Talk About Abortion?” In this ongoing series, a small discussion group meets over lunch to explore timely ethical issues within their respective fields of interests. April’s topic addresses the rhetorical barriers that prevent civil discourse on the issue of abortion. This session is led by Professor Christian Lundberg, Department of Communication Studies and Jan Boxill, Director of the Parr Center for Ethics.

 

Tuesday, April 13th, 2010

Public Lecture, “Super Soldiers.” This Current Science Forum at Morehead features David DeBatto, retired U.S. Army Counterintelligence Special Agent, author and news analyst. Mr. DeBatto discusses how the Pentagon is bioengineering the “Future Warfighter.” Sponsored by the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society, and Parr Center for Ethics.

 

Monday-Tuesday, April 12-13th, 2010

Ethics in the Professions Series Symposium, “Is Nature Enough? Exploring the Ethics of Human Enhancement.” In light of ever-evolving medical innovations, the lines distinguishing ‘normal’ and ‘enhanced’ states of biological being have become increasingly blurred. This two-day mini-conference examines ethical issues raised by advances in research and technology, and the increasing possibilities for transforming the human body.

 

Tuesday, April 13th, 2010

Speaker Symposium. The second day is aimed at students, practitioners, researchers and scholars. A distinguished roster of speakers address specific human enhancement topics ranging from genetic enhancement, neurological enhancement, super-soldiers, surgical and cosmetic enhancements, and the cultural factors that fuel the pursuit of biological enhancements.

 

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Keynote Lecture, “The Case Against Perfection”, featuring Michael Sandel, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government Theory at Harvard University. The first day sets the stage with a panel discussion and keynote presentation.

 

Co-sponsored with Center for Genomics and Society, Department of Social Medicine, Department of Athletics, Department of Biology, Department of Philosophy, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, North Carolina Biotechnology Center, School of Nursing, U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), Whaley Family Foundation, and Duke University’s Kenan Institute for Ethics.

 

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

Public Lecture, “Kenya and the Responsibility to Protect”, featuring Dr. Andrea Bartoli of the Institute for Conflict Analysis & Resolution at George Mason University. Post-election rioting in Kenya in December 2007 brought pressure on Nairobi to end tensions and avert bloodshed on a massive scale. What lessons can be learned from the intervention, and what does it mean for the UN’s emerging “responsibility to protect” doctrine? Co-sponsored with UNC Great Decisions Program.

 

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

Public Discussion, “Immigration and National Identity.”  Expanding on the discussion over immigration reform launched by the September 2009 event, a panel of experts focuses on the issues of citizenship, assimilation and national identity at the heart of the debate over immigration reform. Co-sponsored with the Center for Global Initiatives, and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University.

 

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010

Public Lecture, “Reflections on Speciesism”, featuring Professor Douglas MacLean, Department of Philosophy. Arguments about speciesism have become a mainstay of campaigns to raise awareness about the ethical treatment of animals. Professor MacLean takes a critical look at the meaning and implications of speciesism. This is the second part in a colloquium series on philosophy and the environment. Sponsored by the Institute for the Environment, the Parr Center for Ethics, and the Department of Philosophy.

 

Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010

Bioethics at UNC (BUNC) Group Meeting, “Human Rights, Health Capability, and Global Breastfeeding Policy.” In this monthly meeting group, faculty and graduate students gather over breakfast to discuss timely ethical issues in bioethics. This session is led by Professor Benjamin Meier, Department of Public Policy. Co-sponsored with the Department of Social Medicine.

 

Thursday, March 18th, 2010

Public Lecture, “The Child Trafficking Crisis in Ghana”, featuring James Kofi Annan, founder and executive director of Challenging Heights, an award winning non-profit that advocates for the welfare of children in Ghana and works to rehabilitate child slaves. This event is hosted by CAST in conjunction with OASIS’s Africa Week 2010. Sponsored by CAST (Campus Y), Parr Center for Ethics, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, Carolina Women’s Center in collaboration with OASIS, Invisible Children, EDR, SUDAN, Students for Students International (S4SI), and the Great Decisions program.

 

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl National Championship Competition. Having placed 2nd at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Ethics Bowl Competition hosted by the University of Richmond, a team of undergraduates from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill travels to Cincinnati, Ohio to compete in the National Championship. The Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl combines the excitement and fun of a competitive tournament with a valuable educational experience in a day-long event. The UNC Ethics Bowl Team is sponsored by the Parr Center for Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Campus Y, Division of Student Affairs, the Office of the Chancellor, the Office for Undergraduate Research, Student Congress, and the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence.

 

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

Student Panel Discussion, “How Should We Eat as Students?” A student-led and student-focused panel tackles food issues, including students’ responsibility for campus food offerings, fast food and nutrition, budgeting expenses, and the students’ role in the food system. Panelists are representatives of FLO Food, UNC Young Democrats, Economics Club, Alianza and Ethics Bowl, discussing the issues raised in the panel discussion, “How Should We Eat?” Co-sponsored with FLO Food, UNC Ethics Bowl and Philosophy Club.

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

Public Discussion, “How Should We Eat? Policy and Ethics.” Factory farms. Immigrant labor. Sustainability. Food democracy. World hunger. Access. Environmental impacts. Nutrition. Genetic modification. Organic vs. Conventional. How do we navigate the food industry and make ethical choices about our food consumption? How do we prioritize our ethical concerns? A panel of food experts discusses current questions surrounding food policy and ethics. Co-sponsored with FLO Food and the Philosophy Club.

 

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

Bioethics at UNC (BUNC) Group Meeting, “Justice Concerns in the Use of Psychosocial Criteria to Screen Organ Recipients.” In this monthly meeting group, faculty and graduate students gather over breakfast to discuss timely ethical issues in bioethics. This session is led by Professor Rebecca Walker, Department of Social Medicine. Co-sponsored with the Department of Social Medicine.

 

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

Public Lecture, “Philosophy, Politics, and Objective Truth”, featuring Peter van Inwagen, John Cardinal O’Hara Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. Sponsored by the Program in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, and the Parr Center for Ethics.

 

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

Public Lecture, “Against Ecosystem Services”, featuring Mark Sagoff, Director and Senior Research Scholar at the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy at the University of Maryland, College Park, and  author of The Economy of Earth and Price, Principle, and the Environment. This is the first part in a colloquium series on philosophy and the environment. Sponsored by the Institute for the Environment, the Parr Center for Ethics, and the Department of Philosophy.

 

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

Lunch & Learn Workshop, “Sex Trafficking: Health Implications and Interventions.” In this ongoing series, a small discussion group meets over lunch to explore timely ethical issues within their respective fields of interests. February’s topic examines the issue of the forceful recruitment and transportation of individuals for prostitution and forced labor as one of the fastest growing criminal enterprises. This session is led by Professor Diane Kjervik, School of Nursing and Donna Bickford, Director of Carolina Women’s Center. Co-sponsored with the Carolina Women’s Center.

 

Saturday, February 6th, 2010

Ethics in the Professions Workshop, “Moral Courage and Legal Professionalism”, featuring Parr Center fellow, Kim Strom-Gottfried, Smith P. Theimann Distinguished Professor for Ethics and Professional Practice, UNC School of Social Work, leading a session in the School of Law’s 2010 Festival of Legal Learning. Sponsored by the UNC School of Law and the Parr Center for Ethics.

 

Monday, February 1st, 2010

Public Lecture, “Customary Law as a Guide to Natural Justice”, featuring Professor Amanda Perreau-Saussine, Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge. Co-sponsored with the Department of Philosophy.

 

Thursday, January 28th, 2010

Lunch & Learn Workshop, “The Cost of Food: an Unholy Alliance?” In this ongoing series, a small discussion group meets over lunch to explore timely ethical issues within their respective fields of interests. January’s topic explores how the industrialized food system keeps prices down yet ignores external costs associated with environmental impacts and poor return to small scale farmers. This session is led by Professor Alice Ammerman, Director of the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

 

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

Public Lecture, “Forgiveness Pays”, featuring criminal justice activists, Linda Biehl and Ntobeko Peni. Of the Amy Biehl Foundation Trust (ABFT), an NGO focusing on running after-school programs in dance, drama, music, and HIV peer-education for at-risk and impoverished South African youth, and with the Forgiveness Project. Sponsored by the African Studies Department, Carolina Leadership Development, CUAB, Carolina Women’s Center, Center for Global Initiatives, Criminal Justice Action Awareness Committee (Campus Y), Difficult Dialogues Program, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, Office of the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, Parr Center for Ethics, Philosophy Department, Residential Hall Association and the School of Law.

 

Thursday, December 3rd, 2009
Public Discussion, What Defines Fairness? Theories of Justice and Inequality. A panel of experts discusses fairness, inequality, and the merits of governmental intervention in ensuring justice, covering various thinkers including John Rawls, John Bates Clark, and Amartya Sen. The panel will feature Professors Geoff Sayre-McCord, Ralph Byrns, Douglas MacLean, and Jon Rick. Sponsored by the Program in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, the Philosophy Department, and the Parr Center for Ethics.

Monday, November 30th, 2009
Public Lecture, Predictably Irrational. Dan Ariely, Professor of Behavorial Economics at Duke University, and author of Predictably Irrational, will discuss how the principles of behavioral economics can help us understand some of the irrationalities that influence our everyday behavior, including the choices that we make when it comes to pricing, the effects that expectations have on our decisions, and the factors that cause us to behave (dis)honestly. Co-sponsored with the Carolina Economics Club and the Program in Philosophy, Politics and Economics.

 

Saturday, November 21st, 2009 Mid-Atlantic regional ethics Bowl Competition , hosted by the Jepson School of Leadership Studies at the University of Richmond. A team of undergraduates from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will travel to Richmond, Virgina to compete in the regional competition. The Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl combines the excitement and fun of a competitive tournament with a valuable educational experience for undergraduate students in a day-long event. The UNC Ethics Bowl Team is sponsored by the Parr Center for Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Campus Y, Division of Student Affairs and the Office of the Chancellor.
UNC TAKES SECOND PLACE TROPHY AND ADVANCES TO THE NATIONAL COMPETITION IN CINCINNATI, OHIO.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
Lunch & Learn Workshop, Prenatal Genetic Testing: The Conundrum of Choice. In this ongoing series of workshops, a small discussion group meets over lunch to explore timely ethical issues within their respective fields of interests. Open to faculty, graduate students and undergrads, November’s topic examines the ethical issues of choice that arise in the use of prenatal genetic testing. This session is led by Louise Winstanly, LLB, MS Bioethics.

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009
Public Discussion, What Would It Take to Heal the Wounds of Racism in Chapel Hill? Parr Center Director, Jan Boxill, joins a diverse panel of distinguished local citizens to address the titular question and engage with the audience on issues of racism in the Town of Chapel Hill. Co-sponsored with the Town of Chapel Hill Justice in Action Committee.

Friday, October 30th, 2009
Lunch & Learn Workshop, Healthcare Reform in America. Tom Ricketts, Professor of Health Policy and Administration and Director of the Health Policy Analysis Unit at the UNC Sheps Center for Health Services Research, continues the discussion launched in the previous night’s public panel discussion. In this program a small group of students will discuss their concerns over impending federal health policy legislation with Professor Tom Ricketts. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Parr Center for Ethics and the Health Focus Committee of the Campus Y.

Thursday, October 29th, 2009
Public Discussion, Healthcare Reform: An Ethical Challenge. A panel of experts explores the moral dimensions of the current debates over American healthcare reform efforts, with the focus on identifying the principles that should frame and inform current health reform legislation. In addition to examining the principles driving reform efforts (and its opposition), this program will address what the U.S. can learn from the various healthcare systems found around the world and how those systems were achieved. Sponsored by the Parr Center for Ethics and the Health Focus Committee of the Campus Y.

Thursday, October 29th, 2009
Public Lecture, The Central Dilemma of Humanitarian Action: How Best to Help while Minimizing the Harm, featuring Fiona Terry, Practitioner-in-Residence, Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University and author of Condemned to Repeat? The Paradox of Humanitarian Action. Dr. Terry has spent most of the past 15 years involved in humanitarian relief operations in different parts of the world, including Northern Iraq, Somalia, the Great Lakes region of Africa, Liberia, and along the Sino-Korean border. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the Student Global Health Committee’s Health and Human Rights Speaker Series, UNC Student Congress, and the Center for Global Initiatives.

Wednesday, October 28th, 2009
Lunch & Learn Workshop, The Unforgivable Offense. In this ongoing series of workshops, a small discussion group meets over lunch to explore timely ethical issues within their respective fields of interests. Open to faculty, graduate students and undergrads, October’s topic examines the issue of forgiveness and redemption in relation to the ethical failures of public officials. This session is led by Professor Kim Strom-Gottfried, School of Social Work.

Wednesday, October 28th, 2009
Ethics in the Professions Series, Ethics in the Workplace. Offered through UNC Human Resources’ training and Development Department, this course is an introduction to ethical decision making. Whether in the classroom, the office, or at home, we all have to make decisions that have important ethical implications. The goal of this course is to help participants learn how to identify ethical issues, think about them productively, and arrive at ethically sound decisions. To meet those objectives, participants will learn some introductory ethical theory that will provide a philosophical framework for exploring ethical questions. Then, using a number of real case studies, including participants’ own experiences, we will apply the philosophical framework to the situations in hopes of uncovering and resolving the relevant ethical conflicts. Participants will leave the course prepared to share their skills in ethical decision making with their colleagues.

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009
Public Performance, Wing Woman, presented by Interactive Theatre Carolina. As part of Race Relations Week and Coming Out Week, this performance tackles the issue of sexual identitiy and orientation and at UNC-Chapel Hill. Interactive Theatre Carolina (ITC) engages the audience using scripted and improvisational theatre to promote health/wellness and social justice in our local community.

Friday, October 2nd, 2009
Public Lecture, Ethics in Medicine and Research: Lessons from Dr. Mengele, featuring Eva Mozes-Kor, Holocaust survivor. Subjected to Dr. Josef Mengele’s medical experiments in Auschwitz Concentration Camp, Eva Mozes-Kor has emerged through a life filled with trauma as a brilliant example of the power of the human spirit to persevere. Her words give tangible significance to human subject protections and motivates industry professionals to give thoughtful consideration to the subjects that volunteer for research. Sponsored by the Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP).

Thursday, October 1st, 2009
Public Lecture, Has Prejudice Really Faded? This week’s Current Science Forum at Morehead features Keith Payne, Associate Professor of Psychology. Over the past 50 years, overt racism in America has dwindled; however, we are still vulnerable to subtle and unconscious stereotyping. Dr. Payne leads a provocative discussion that draws from research on social cognition and the unintended consequences of our unconscious biases as well as broader studies on race and the 2008 presidential election. Sponsored by the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, and Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society.

Thursday-Saturday, September 24-26th, 2009
National Conference, Democratic Education in the Spirit of John Dewey. As part of the the Annual Meeting of South Atlantic Philosophy of Education Society (SAPES), this three-day event celebrates John Dewey for his contributions to progressive education, and highlights contemporary efforts in democratic education. Sponsored by the School of Education.

Thursday, September 24th, 2009
Public Lecture, Obama and the World, featuring Strobe Talbott, President of Brookings Institution and a distinguished former foreign correspondent. Sponsored by the Curriculum in International and Area Studies, Center for Global Initiatives and Department of Political Science.

Thursday, September 24th, 2009
Public Lecture, The Secrecy Hangover, featuring Tom Blanton, director of the National Security Archive. Presenting the annual Lucile Kelling Henderson Lecture, Blanton talks about issues of government secrecy and the challenges facing the Obama administration on transparency. A special screening of the award-winning documentary, “Secrecy” is showing immediately after the post-lecture reception. The lecture, movie and reception are free and open to the public, however seating is limited.  Sponsored by the School of Information and Library Science and the Center for Global Initiatives.

Thursday, September 17th, 2008
Public Lecture, Remaking America: Higher Education and Civic Engagement. The Thomas Willis Lambeth Lecture in Public Policy features James A. Joseph, former ambassador to South Africa and Professor of the Practice of Public Policy Studies at Duke University. Sponsored by the Department of Public Policy and the Parr Center for Ethics.

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009
Lunch & Learn Workshop, Undocumented Immigrants in America: Defining Human Rights. In this ongoing series of workshops, a small discussion group meets over lunch to explore timely ethical issues within their respective fields of interests. Open to faculty, graduate students and undergrads, September’s topic continues the discussion launched in the previous week’s public panel discussion, examining the concept of human rights and its applicability for undocumented immigrants in the U.S. This session is led by Professor Judith Blau, Department of Sociology and Professor Ryan Preston, Department of Philosophy.

Thursday, September 10th, 2009
Public Discussion, Undocumented Immigrants in America: Access to Higher Education. A panel of experts explores the ethical dimensions of the current debates over access to public services by undocumented immigrants in the U.S. This event is coordinated in conjunction with UNC’s first year student summer reading book selection, “A Home on the Field,” by Paul Cuadros, Assistant Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Co-sponsored with the Center for Global Initiatives and Difficult Dialogues.

Thursday, August 26th, 2009
Parr Center for Ethics Fellows Luncheon.